Glamorous Clothes, Glamorous Lifestyle, Drinking and Partying With Celebrities, Yet Feeling Empty and Depressed Inside… Until She Found God

The video below relates the story of a lady who had what many others dream of — a life of glamour, luxury, and friendships with famous celebrities.

Yet deep inside, she felt empty and depressed… until she found.

Watch her amazing testimony below.

 

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EVEN THE RICH CRAVE FOR MORE: 19-Year Old Sets Own Ferrari on Fire Because He Wanted A New One

This is an enlightening story that appeared in Zero Hedge, illustrating that even those who seem to have it all can become dissatisfied, and crave for more:

On October 24, 2014, the 19-year old son of a wealthy Swiss businessman walked into a brothel in the Bavarian town of Augsburg.

Although by almost any standard he led a rather splendid existence, on this particular night he had reached his breaking point. The problem: he drove a 2011 Ferrari 458 Italia.

2011 Ferrari 458 Italia

That may look nice enough, but the issue is that there’s a 2014 Ferrari Italia, and let’s face it, no one – and we mean no one – would want to be caught dead in the vehicle shown above when the one shown below is just waiting to be driven off the lot.

2014 Ferrari Italia

Of course this is exactly the type of situation that insurance – or, more acurately, insurance fraud – is for.

And so this young man – allegedly with the help of the Ferrari dealer – did what anyone would do in this situation: he drove to Bavaria, went to see a prostitute (one needs an alibi), and paid two accomplices $15,000 to douse the old junker in gasoline and light it on fire.

The young man almost got away with his fraud when the authorities initially thought that the incident was in retaliation for unpaid prostitute fees. Nonetheless, investigators later concluded that this was “all a not-so-elaborate ploy to collect the insurance money on the way to buying the newer model“.

Asked by a judge why he had gone to such lengths given that his father had bought him 14 other cars (including a Lamborghini) as well as “several properties” worth in excess of $25 million, he confessed that although his monthly allowance (between CHF5,000 and CHF10,000) was generous enough, it wasn’t sufficient to cover the difference between the 2011 and the 2014 458s and he didn’t feel comfortable telling his father the truth – namely, that the 2011 458 “no longer pleased him.”

For his troubles, the young man received 30 months of probabtion and a €30,000 fine. There was no word on whether he was able to get the 2014 Speciale.

Now, this is what the bible says:

6 But godliness with contentment is great gain. 7 For we brought nothing into the world, and we can take nothing out of it. 8 But if we have food and clothing, we will be content with that. 9 Those who want to get rich fall into temptation and a trap and into many foolish and harmful desires that plunge people into ruin and destruction.” (1 Timothy 6:6-9; NIV)

NEWS: Many U.S. Millionaires ‘Fear Losing It All’, ‘Feel Compelled to Strive for More’, Says UBS Survey

Enough never seems to be enough. According to a survey by Swiss bank, UBS, it seems that many successful U.S. millionaires suffer from anxiety and insecurity, despite accumulating more wealth than the average person.

The survey — which involved 2,215 U.S. investors with more than $1 million in net worth — revealed that while millionaires recognise their good fortune, they feel compelled to strive for more, spurred on by their own ambition, their desire to protect their families’ lifestyle, and an ever-present fear of losing it all.

As a result, many feel stuck on a treadmill, without a real sense of how much wealth would make them satisfied enough to get off.

Said Paula Polito, Client Strategy Officer, UBS Wealth Management Americas, “The majority of millionaires say they have worked hard to earn their wealth and appreciate the lifestyle it affords them and their families. But enough never seems to be enough—even the wealthiest continue on the treadmill to achieve a better life.”

Becoming a millionaire does not come without a price:  64% of millionaires report that they have had to give up precious family time to achieve their dreams. Most millionaires (68%) admit to having regrets, most commonly around making mistakes in a relationship with their spouse or family and not spending more time with family.

Despite achieving success at a relatively young age, the UBS survey also showed that Millennial millionaires experience more stress, fear and anxiety about their wealth than older generations.

Achieving success at such a young age means that Millennials’ wealth has a longer lifespan and therefore a greater chance of being lost, so they have to be more diligent and put in more effort to maintain their fortune and lifestyle,” said Sameer Aurora, Head of Investor Insights for UBS Wealth Management Americas. “Millennials, more so than any other generation, are also very conscious of how their lives stack up against their peers’, so Millennials tend to put pressure on themselves to earn more and compete for a higher standing in the social hierarchy.

Many people aspire to be successful and to acquire great wealth, thinking that this would bring them a lifetime of happiness and peace. However, the UBS survey showed that this perception is not the reality. Instead, it is contentment that brings joy and peace.

But godliness with contentment is great gain. For we brought nothing into the world, and we can take nothing out of it. But if we have food and clothing, we will be content with that.  Those who want to get rich fall into temptation and a trap and into many foolish and harmful desires that plunge people into ruin and destruction.  For the love of money is a root of all kinds of evil. Some people, eager for money, have wandered from the faith and pierced themselves with many griefs. (1 Timothy 6:6-10; NIV)